10 Ways to Naturally De-stress: Guest Post – Vanessa Bermudez

Stress is more dangerous than you may think. While stress comes in many different forms (and can even push you to do better in the workplace), it is one of the biggest threats to the healthy lifestyle you deserve to lead. The American Psychological Association states that those who face chronic stress in their daily lives are more at risk for cardiovascular diseases, arrhythmias, and even sudden death. When you start to feel a heavy weight on your shoulders, it may be time to step back, take a deep breath, and contemplate some natural ways to destress.

“Incorporating stress management activities into your daily routine, along with a healthy diet, will help your body heal much faster. Personally, I find this to be one of the most challenging aspects of good health. It’s easy to get caught up in your daily life and forget to take break. However, it is necessary if you want to experience true healing,” says Jen Broyles, certified Holistic Health and Nutrition Coach. If you’re feeling stressed and aren’t sure how to tackle it, consider these natural ways to find some peace of mind.

10 Ways to Naturally De-stress: Guest Post - Vanessa Bermudez

1. Take a yoga class
Yoga is an enriching, mindful practice that can help you manage the source of your anxieties. The physical poses, deep breathing, and meditation found in yoga promotes a sense of awareness of your mind, soul and body. This natural state of relaxation has the potential to relieve your mind of its stress and focus on the present moment. If you’re feeling overloaded, consider joining a local yoga class or practicing a new routine at home.

2. Make a cup of warm tea
Set the coffee aside and pick up a cup of warm tea instead. Studies have shown that your mom is right – tea really can lower your stress levels, in part to its chemical properties and benefits that tell your brain to take it easy. The study also notes, interestingly enough, that even the act of putting a kettle on the stove can reduce your stress.

3. Go on a quick stroll outside
One of the simplest, cost-effective ways to get a grip on your stress is by taking a walk outside. Walking can boost endorphins and reorganize brain neurons, allowing you to reconnect to the nature that surrounds you. With all the hustle and bustle in the digital age, it can be easy to forget what matters most, but taking a leisurely stroll around the park can remind you of the world’s natural beauty.

Woman walking along the beach

4. Take a salt bath
When you’re feeling the stress, consider an epsom salt bath. Stress reduces our body’s level of magnesium, so the magnesium in epsom salt does wonders when absorbed through the skin in a nice, warm bath. It promotes a peaceful sense of relaxation that can also help us focus better, sleep better, and feel more energized in the morning. The benefits of an epsom salt bath don’t stop at reducing your stress, but well into your daily life.

5. Visualize peaceful surroundings
The power of the mind is stronger than you think – even the National Institutes for Health “recognizes the power of guided imagery to elicit relaxation response,” according to the Huffington Post. You can practice visualization anywhere you are, at any time. Simply closing your eyes, taking deep breaths, and picturing peaceful surroundings (like a hot sandy beach in the Bahamas) can help lower your feelings of stress.

Woman meditating next to lake

6. Watch a good comedy
“Laughter enhances your intake of oxygen-rich air, stimulates your heart, lungs and muscles, and increases the endorphins that are released by your brain,” explains the Mayo Clinic. It costs nothing to laugh, but it means everything to your health! When faced with a great deal of stress, it may help to watch a comedy film – or crack a few jokes with a friend – to get some endorphins rushing.

7. Incorporate CBD oil into your routine
Cannabidiol, or CBD oil, is a natural anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-pain remedy for many looking for alternative treatment. It’s known for its natural cannabis-derived properties that lets you enjoy all the relaxation from the plant, without the psychoactive THC. In other words, CBD oil helps you feel calm and collected without getting a high. “For many with a lifetime of experimenting with different products, CBD oil can be a new solution. We would encourage anyone trying something new to speak to a professional they trust,” says Marc Lewis, editor at Remedy Review.

8. Turn off your phone
No, seriously – turn off your phone! It can be difficult in today’s age, when the average workday extends far past 9 to 5, to turn away from the screen and call it a day. However, it’s more important than ever to disconnect from the screens before it starts to take a big toll on your stress. Consider turning off your electronics for an hour every day to feel your stress melt away.

A switched off mobile phone

9. Do some deep breathing
Your breathing can be a powerful tool when it comes to managing your own stress, so take advantage of it. Practicing some deep breathing techniques sends a message to your brain that allows for it to calm down and think about the bigger picture. There are a variety of different methods out there to try, but a personal favorite is the 4-7-8 Breathing Exercise recommended by Dr. Weil, M.D.

10. Write down what you’re thankful for
We have so much to be thankful for that it can be easy to forget. In order to manage your anxieties better, try making a list of everything you are appreciative for. This practice of mindfulness can help you feel more equipped to handle life’s next big obstacle by reminding yourself of what’s truly important: your health, happiness, and ability to lead a stress-free life.

Author Bio

Vanessa Bermudez - author bio photo

Vanessa Bermudez is a contributing writer for Remedy Review and is based in Brooklyn, New York. She is the co-founder and editor of Modern Girls, a collaborative digital space featured in Girl Gaze Project and Teen Vogue.

Author: Living Life Our Way

NP and home ed mum, conservationist, nature lover, blogger, SEN & MH advocate, ex teacher. ~Don't think outside the box, think like there is no box~

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