Five Reasons to Love Hemp

Hemp is a highly sustainable plant that can be used for a wide range of purposes. Whilst in some countries it is illegal to grow hemp, many feel this is a very outdated view based on misconception and innaccurate facts. Here in the UK, hemp is legal under government regulations, with a license. So why is it not better utilised? Good question! There are many reasons why hemp is the answer to a more sustainable future.

Here are five reasons to love hemp…

● Hemp is able to grow in different climates, does not require pesticides or herbicides and only needs moderate amounts of water and fertiliser. It only takes approximately 4 months from planting to harvest. So it is relatively quick and easy to grow!

● On an annual basis, more than twice as much hemp fibre vs cotton can be produced so it is a great source of material for clothes, linen and textiles. Also, 1 acre of hemp can produce as much paper as 2-4 acres of trees. Think how many trees hemp could save!

● Hemp is actually better quality than many other materials. For example, hemp paper can last hundreds of years and be recycled far more times. Hemp can also produce fibreboard that is stronger and lighter than wood.

● Hemp is environmentally friendly. It does not require as many toxic chemicals to produce paper, compared to tree-based paper. It can produce high quality substitutes to many plastic products, which would solve our ever-growing plastic pollution problem. Hemp oil can make non-toxic ink, paint, varnish and other things. It could be also be a highly efficient source of clean energy/ fuel.

● Hemp is highly nutritious and high in protein, it could be used to make a wide range of food. It can also be medicinal too.

So hemp could be used effectively in every aspect of our lives; from our clothes and our homes (including floors, curtains, bedding etc…) to our food, from fuel for our homes and cars to making the car itself, provide us with jobs and be used in our workplace, even our technology devices could be made from hemp… what an amazing plant!

If you would like to find out more or shop for hemp products, here are some websites with a good range of items…

www.yaoh.co.uk

www.thehempshop.co.uk

#Blogtober 2016 – Day 13: What’s In My Fridge

Does anyone seriously want to read about what’s in my fridge? Hmmm, doubtful! So let’s make this a quick one! 

Food, drink, vegan food, healthy eating

Basically there is a selection of fruit and veg, potatoes, pure sunflower spread, violife vegan cheese, flaxseed, innocent smoothies (I make my own daily with a nutribullet using fresh ingredients, but Squiggle likes these so we sometimes buy them), condiments and almond milk. Oh and there may also be a few beer bottles tucked in the corner there too! 

We try to eat as much raw food as possible and we are also what is apparently known as flexitarians (and/ or reducetarians?) because we eat a primarily plant based diet and have mindfully reduced our consumption of meat, yet we are flexible about it. I would say we are about 90% vegetarian and 75% vegan. 

Squiggle has personally chosen not to eat meat from a young age, which is actually what initiated changes to my own diet in the first place, in order to respect her wishes and still accomodate both of our dietary needs. This later led to the further developments, both for our own health and the benefit of the environment. Prior to this I ate a reasonably healthy diet, but it did include far more meat and processed food, and less proper nutrition!

#Blogtober16

30 Days Wild – Day 24: Microbeads 

What are microbeads?

• Microbeads are tiny bits of plastic found in some personal and beauty care products, such as toothpaste, scrubs, sunscreens and make-up.

• The microbeads used are mainly made of polyethylene (PE), but can be also be made of polypropylene (PP), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and nylon. If any of these are listed under ingredients then the product contains microbeads.

• Microbeads wash off your body and down the drain, then end up in oceans.

• Microbeads, and other microplastics absorb harmful chemicals like a sponge. They become over a million times more toxic than the water around them.

• Fish and other marine life mistake them for food and eat them.

You can pledge to go #beadfree by only choosing products that are free from microbeads.

For more information about microbeads and plastic pollution, check out the following websites:

www.5gyres.org

www.beatthemicrobead.org