Housing Rabbits: A Hutch Is Not Enough

A while back now I mentioned that I would write more about the enclosure we have for our beautiful pair of bunny furbabies. They are a larger breed and we couldn’t find anything on the market that we felt offered them enough space, but equally we are not DIY minded enough to make anything secure enough ourselves. So we set about having an enclosure custom – made by a highly rated ebay seller, and gave our exact specifications. We found this to be a relatively cheap option, it arrived very easy to assemble and is great quality construction; just what we need! 

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We didn’t want anything to be able to dig in or out of their new home, so we laid down some wire mesh flooring, secured to the enclosure using cable ties, then covered it over with rolls of turf so the bunnies would be none the wiser! Then we added a shelter, plus some tunnels for them to play and hide in as well. They love their enclosure! 

Step By Step Guide

Measure the wire mesh to slightly larger than the enclosure area and cut it to size. Lay it down flat. Overlap any joins and cable tie them securely.

fabbits, bunnies, pets, furbabies, enclosure, a hutch is not enough, animal welfare, home and garden, custom made

Put the enclosure frame on top of the wire flooring, making sure there is an overlap around the edges.

fabbits, bunnies, pets, furbabies, enclosure, a hutch is not enough, animal welfare, home and garden, custom made

Secure the wire mesh to the bottom of the enclosure using cable ties. Make sure they are very tight so can’t be chewed and cut off the end being careful not to leave sharp edges.

fabbits, bunnies, pets, furbabies, enclosure, a hutch is not enough, animal welfare, home and garden, custom made

Lay rolls of turf over the floor to cover over the wire. Take care to ensure there are no exposed edges or sharp bits of wire anywhere. 

fabbits, bunnies, pets, furbabies, enclosure, a hutch is not enough, animal welfare, home and garden, custom made

Shelter and Accessories

We then added a dog kennel from Pets at Home and burrow pipes from runaround for shelter and protection too. We also left the extra roll of turf we had spare in the enclosure as a little hill/ mound as well. We will introduce new things over time for further enrichment of course. 

fabbits, bunnies, pets, furbabies, enclosure, a hutch is not enough, animal welfare, home and garden, custom made, runaround

The wire roof has a fold back panel opening. Once closed it is secured with padlocks and then partially covered over for extra protection. 

fabbits, bunnies, pets, furbabies, enclosure, a hutch is not enough, animal welfare, home and garden, custom made, runaround

Final Thoughts

Ideally this would be connected to a shed and/ or have extra adjoining sections. We hope that we can build them an extension soon! However, free range access to the garden under supervision for daily exercise is a good alternative too though. 

Do you have pet rabbits? What type of enclosure do they live in?

#Blogtober 2016 – Day 11: Your Favourite Type of Animal

I love animals, but I do have a few particular favourites that spring to mind. Growing up, dogs were my absolute firm favourite. I would spend many hours learning about different dog breeds, and I had a pet dog who I adored, a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel called Cindy. I would love to have a dog now, but circumstances mean it isn’t really possible in the near future. One day maybe! We love spending time with my dad’s gorgeous Labradors though.

Pets, dogs, labrador, black labrador, golden labrador, furry family, furbabies

Cats are another animal that I have a huge soft spot for. We have two cats, one of whom is desperately trying to stop me typing in order to stroke him right now! We also have two bunnies, so I will count them as a favourite too, I wouldn’t want them to feel left out!

Furry family, furbabies, giant french lop, white rabbit

Last but not least, seals are another favourite. Watching them in their natural environment, seeing them give birth, watching inquisitive newborns interact with Squiggle and other humans… it is simply mind-blowing. Learning about the story of Ropeneck, a mother who was rescued when she got a rope caught tightly around her neck and has since returned to the same spot on the Lincolnshire coast to give birth every pupping season, inspired and motivated me to take more action to protect our ocean mammals. 

Rope entanglement, scarred, seals, pups, ocean mammals, empathy
This is Rope neck. She turned up on Donna Nook beach in Lincs, UK in 2006 with a rope around her neck slowly cutting into the flesh. She was caught and freed, but heavily scarred. Ropeneck now returns to the same spot at the same time every year to pup. (This particular photo was taken by myself in November 2014).

This also led me to discover the story of the Lonely Whale, which then guided me to various other organisations too, all of whom work hard to make positive and lasting changes for ocean health and the well-being of the living creatures who reside in it.

Amazing how one animal… one story… can have such a major impact on our lives!

#Blogtober16

Our Week in Pictures

We started this week back in Weymouth to revisit the Sealife Centre as we found it so relaxing and therapeutic last month. We often find it helpful to return to places of interest quite soon after the previous visit, especially when something specific has captured her attention, because subsequent visits often add a new dimension to the place visited. We find the familiarity of the environment provides her with security and confidence (but yet at this stage the place is still ‘new’ enough that her expectations aren’t too rigid) so she is able to build on the previous experience and add even more value to it, by allowing her to extend her interests further and encouraging new interests at the same time.

Highlights of this visit were playing in the water (yes, even at this time of year!), going on the seal ride, watching and discussing the various fish, different types of turtles, studying the corals and anenomes, observing the seals again and alot of laughter!

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Sealife Centre at Weymouth

Later in the week we visited a local park on Thursday, attended a home education group visit to KIDS playground on Friday, went to a home education information session on Saturday (which mainly turned into an excuse to play in another local park with her friend most of time!) and then finished the week by going to a family- friendly disco with another friend on Sunday. She also enjoyed time at home drawing, playing and caring for her pet bunnies.

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Playing at a local park
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KIDS playground home ed group
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Home ed info session/ playing in a local park
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Bopping Babes disco
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Drawing
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Feeding her pet bunnies