100 Days of Home Ed #LoveHomeEd – Day 57 (Peanut Butter Fish Lessons)

5 Keys to Our Homeschooling Life

My name is Randi and I homeschool our two boys, ages 8 and 7.  We live in the southeastern United States and are just finishing up our third year of homeschooling.  We started homeschooling after our oldest son finished kindergarten and we realized he was not going to fit the mold that the public schools expected of him.  I did lots of research about different methods and styles of schooling when preparing for our first year of homeschool and throughout that year.  It took a little while to figure out what would work for us and we now use an eclectic method of homeschooling, combining some very structured curriculum with a variety of other methods.  Below are five areas that we consider key to our homeschooling.

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1: Living books

During my research I came across the Charlotte Mason method of teaching.  While I didn’t feel the whole method was a good match for my boys, I did like her idea of living books.  Living books are different than textbooks in that they pull the reader into the story and make the topic ‘come alive’.  We read many well-written biographies and historical fiction books, as well as a series of math living books.  While I read, the boys often color or draw.  Our favorites have been the Magic Tree house series, the Who Was or What Was collection, the I Survive series, An Interactive History Adventure series, and the Life of Fred collection of math books.  The Sir Cumference math series and Story of My World are on our list for next year! 

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Coloring in our North American Explorers coloring book

2: Multi-sensory learning

Multisensory learning simply means learning through more than one sense.  It is a technique that often helps children who have difficulty learning as it engages their brains in different ways.  When buying structured curriculum, I typically try to use programs that are multi-sensory.  For example, we use a reading program that is Orton-Gillingham based.  The activities teach reading through sight, sound, and touch.  We also use Montessori materials in learning our math skills, allowing the boys to learn through touch and sight while I give auditory input at times.

I try to incorporate multisensory activities when creating learning activities.  When we studied deserts, we made shoe box dioramas of deserts with the type of soil/sand one would find in a particular desert and models of the plants and animals.  We draw pictures of poems to help us visualize what the words are telling us.  I also create sorting mats with colored photographs as a hands on activity to learn how objects, plants, animals, etc. are classified.

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Math with Montessori materials

3: Field trips

Field trips are my favorite way to learn.  I personally love to get out of the classroom and now that we are nearing the end of our school year, I have started scheduling them for every Friday.  They reinforce what we have learned and introduce new topics to study.  For example, while hiking recently at a national battlefield, my oldest son started reviewing the different categories of rock and asking how minerals worked into the classification system.  Thank goodness I had a phone to google the information!  They allow us to learn information in a way, I cannot create in our classroom.  The boys remember the information better because they have experienced it instead of just hearing or reading about it.  Locally this year we have visited national battlefields and science, art and history museums.  Whenever we travel now, we work in learning experiences.  This year we scheduled a week long field trip to Washington DC and the Williamsburg, VA area, both rich in history.  We took advantage of art and science museums as there as well.  We hope to do more week long field trips in the future.

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Learning how to work with silver at Colonial Williamsburg

4: Nature study

One of my goals of homeschooling was for the boys (and myself) to become much more educated about our natural surroundings.  I find hiking calms my mind so we try to get outside as much as we can.  I have tried with varying degrees of success to incorporate daily walks into our routine and we go on longer hikes locally and on day or overnight trips when we can.  I have bought guide books to help us identify trees, rocks, clouds, birds, and other plants and animals.  We don’t pull those out as much as we would like to, though.  I have also bought some more structured books to help us learn specific nature topics, but they haven’t yet made it into our daily routine.  But thankfully, we have my phone to google the many questions that come up when we are outside.  And maybe this is all the structure to nature study that we need!

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Strawberry picking

5: Life Skills

We also try to use the increased time in our day and flexibility of homeschooling to make sure the boys are acquiring all the skills they will need as adults.  Together we work in the garden, grocery shop, and sometimes cook.  They received toolboxes this year and my husband is helping them learn how to fix items around the house, put furniture together, and do simple repairs on our cars.  They also perform a variety of chores.  Honestly, it would be easier to do the chores myself than take the time to coach them through doing them properly, but as I tell them, they most likely will not be able to afford a cleaning service when they leave home!

Putting a new desk together

Whenever we have a day or a week where I am questioning why it is that we homeschool, I come back to these five keys.  These bring joy to our schooling to offset those moments where maybe math or spelling has brought all of us to tears.  They keep us going and keep us bonded together as a family.

You can find more from Randi here:

www.peanutbutterfishlessons.com

100 Days of Home Ed #LoveHomeEd – Day 56 (Amanda)

Introduction

Hi, I’m Amanda (36) I have a passion for photography, nature, nutrition and history. I’m currently doing an online course in Nutrition and Health. I’m married to David (37) who is a self-employed painter and decorator, fantastic at DIY and woodwork and an avid gamer ! We have 4 boys aged 12, 11, 10 and 6.

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How long have you home educated for and why did you decide to do it?

Our boys have never been to school. I started looking into Home education when our eldest son was about 2 years old. I loved everything I read about home educating and thought it would really suit our family and way of life. Initially I was only planning to home educate our children until the age of 7 but we all loved it so much that we have just continued.

Briefly describe your home ed style. Do you have a ‘typical’ week and what does it include if so?

I like to be quite organised and plan things so we have always had a semi-structured but flexible timetable. We mostly learn by doing projects together, I say ‘we’ as I have learnt so much myself alongside my boys.

What was your highlight of home ed last week?

Last week went away to Cornwall. We did a lot of exploring and visiting hidden gems ! We went to the beautiful Golitha falls, walked through the most enchanting woodland to Lansallos beach and visted Bodmin jail.

What is your favourite thing about home edding your children?

I have so many favourite things about home educating ! I get to spend so much time with my children. We can spend as much time as we like learning about a particular topic, sometimes we spend hours just discussing things, which I feel is the most important part of truly learning and taking in information. I myself have learnt so much and discovered what I am really interested in. We are free to do what we want when we want in our own time and as a bonus places are always so much quieter in term time!

What do you find most difficult and why?

The thing I find most difficult about home educating is making sure that I give each of my boys enough time and attention. I worry sometimes if I am doing the right thing by them but I guess this is something that just comes with parenting!

What advice would you give to other home educators?

My advice to new Home educators would be this: Enjoy the freedom you have and time you get to spend with your children. Don’t rush to book up every activity or workshop going, and don’t worry about your child learning to read and write by a certain age; it will happen when they are ready!

100 Days of Home Ed #LoveHomeEd – Day 46 (They Grow So Quick)

Introduction

Hi, I am Emma, mum of three boys Seb who is 6, Alex aged 4 and Barney who is 1. We live in West Yorkshire. 

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How long have you home educated for and what made you decide to do it?

Seb became compulsory school age last January so officially we have been home educating since then. None of my children have ever been to nursery or school. 

I first joined a home ed group on Facebook when Seb was around 2 years old and I found that it just made sense to me and I wanted the home ed lifestyle for my own children. So I began to find out about the local home ed scene and met some lovely people. 

Briefly describe your home ed style. Do you have a ‘typical’ week and what does it include if so?

I have found the longer we home ed for the more autonomous we are, I did originally plan on being fairly structured but it really didn’t suit us and we work much better with more flexibility. Each week is different and I love that. 

What was your highlight of home ed last week?

We had a fantastic day at a local farm. Going midweek meant it was very quiet so we were able to take our time and look at everything in detail. Another random highlight was Seb (who would be in year 1 if schooled) adding up at the shop, we had 3 books at £2.99 each and he told me how much it would total without thought. Little things like that show menthat he is progressing well even if his education doesn’t always look like traditional learning. 

What is your favourite thing about home edding your children?

It has to be the freedom and ability to be spontaneous. We are so lucky that we can wake up and if it is a beautiful day we can head off to the coast or to explore a new park. 

What do you find most difficult and why?

Some days are stressful! Like most siblings my boys can be best friends one minute and arguing the next. I think this is the same in all families though, schooled or not.

What advice would you give to other home educators?

Deschool yourself and don’t compare your child to others because we all learn at our own pace. 

Find out more about their wonderful home ed adventures over on their blog at www.theygrowsoquick.com 

100 Days of Home Ed #LoveHomeEd – Day 45 (he2kidsandme)

I’m he2kidsandme; HE as in Home Education, my 2 kids are Big kid who’s 14, Little kids who’s 8 and me, Jo. The name doesn’t give any credit to my husband who is a big part of our family but doesn’t appear much in our adventures because he’s usually at work or behind the scenes at home, cooking the dinner, keeping the four walls standing and the roof above our head. Sorry about that love. 😉 

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On a ride at Alton Towers

We’re relatively new to Home education, Big Kid came out of school just over a year ago, half way through year 9 and Little kid about 8 months ago at the end of year 2. School just wasn’t a good fit for Big kid, she managed through Primary in a tiny Village School with less than 60 pupils but the transition to secondary was a disaster from the start, she was very unhappy and taking her out was the best decision we have ever made. Little kid seemed to enjoy school but we didn’t feel the middle school he was allocated was suitable and since he has been home he has talked a lot about how unhappy he was with some things that happened at school.

I don’t think we have really found our home ed style yet, I don’t know if we will ever have a set style. I imagine it will forever be changing according to the kids needs and interest. At the moment we do lots of clubs and groups: French and a craft group for Big kid and Art, gymnastics, trampoline and STEM for Little kid. We go on lots of trips and visits and I organise a social meet up for the HE teenagers in the area a few times a month. This month I am trying a bit of ‘strewing’ on the subject of Space and we have had quite a bit of engagement from both kids which I am very pleased with. 

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Climbing trees

Recently we have been doing ‘Field trip friday’ our last few field trips were the National Holocaust museum, The Classical Spectacular at The Royal Albert Hall and a Science Fair at Warwick Castle our favourite by far was the Classical Spectacular, we all thoroughly enjoyed it even though we’re not really into Classical music.

I think my favourite thing about home educating the children is watching them enjoy things, and get excited about stuff. They are both more confident and much better company since they have been home and I think that’s because we don’t seem to be rushing all the time (although we are always late!). I think the thing I find most difficult about Home education is that I miss my work, I miss my colleagues and adult conversation and I miss feeling I have made a difference to someone (outside of the family) but I’m starting a new very part time job soon so I hope to get that feeling back. 

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Our annual Christmas carousel ride

The advice I received which I found most useful was “Forget School! Learning at home doesn’t and shouldn’t look like School.” Every time I have doubts, to remind myself of that, I sneak off to the loo and look through my Instagram and remind myself about all the experiences the kids have had and try to think of just one thing they learned from the experience – the thing they learned is not usually the ‘learning objective’ a teacher would have planned but something I completely overlooked or was totally unrelated. It’s like having a toddler all over again, you’ve got somewhere you need to be but they’ve got 400 questions about the ant on a leaf floating in a puddle – now we’ve got time to watch the ant, hypothesise about how he got on the leaf or where he’s going, find out what leaf it is, learn about viscosity, look for other ants ……. . And, now you know why we’re always late.

If you are interested you can follow our adventures at he2kidsandme on Instagram.

100 Days of Home Ed #LoveHomeEd – Day 44 (GWkid)

Introduction

I am the mother of the GWkid on utube! We are home Educators for a while every day changes therefore so does learning people always ask when do you stop edding the answer is never! We learn all day everyday baby! when we want how we want and what we want. We are very blessed to be able to enjoy learning in this way.

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How long have you home educated for and why did you decide to do it?

We have been home Educating for approximately 2 years. We decide to home educate to provide God centred quality Education for our child.


Briefly describe your home ed style. Do you have a ‘typical’ week and what does it include if so?


I would say we are structure-flexible. Subjects activities and times within the day are set although we are very open to allowing the child to learn when they are ready in the format they most thrive in or enjoy weather it be outside with or without friends table learning games household chores or shopping. I use regular daily activities to teach the Bible along with Mathematics, Science, English, and my UTW (Understand the world) subjects. Again this style may change as the child develops to better support the learning more effectively and most importantly to increase the fun!


What was your highlight of home ed last week?

My highlight is at it is everyday watching my child grow and develop into the child God wishes him to be and me gaining confidence daily from God to know that my husband and I are blessed to be facilitating this beautiful journey.

What is your favourite thing about home ed?

Being able to bring our child up as we wish to.

What do you find most difficult and why?

Finding other families that match our way of HE was a struggle at first but to be honest it has become a plus as I think I was spending to much time worrying about creating a village of likeminded HE friends. When I stopped and just focused on my child and family God sent me friends that proved to be just what we needed rather than what wanted. Life has been stress free and easy ever since ! I love Home Education!

What advice would you give to other home educators?

Let the love for your child guide your guidance of them.

Find them on YouTube here.

100 Days of Home Ed #LoveHomeEd – Day 43 

We are a larger than average family, with 7 children aged 22, 21, 17, 14, nearly 8, 5 & 3. The eldest 2 are now obviously grown up and getting on with adult lives and our 17 yr old is due to start college soon, but the younger 4 are still very much in full time home education stage. We have been home educating for 7 years now.

Our eldest 2 went all through school with a mixture of success and struggles, but when J & S (now 17 & 14 year olds) were in primary school we started to wonder if there were alternatives. I had friends in the States who home schooled and I had always felt quite envious, presuming that here in the UK it would not be a legal option. I cannot even remember what prompted the initial Google search, but something did one day when the kids were on summer holidays between J going up to year 6 and S going up to year 3. I can’t even remember what I searched or where exactly that led me, but I suddenly found myself aware that Home Education was not only something legal here – but also very simple to do and actually quite common! It was like a suddenly realising you lived next to an amazing garden that you never knew existed – I wanted to explore every single possibility, my mind swam wildly with excitement and everything seemed to make so much more sense. 

J had never really been happy in school, he has ASD and struggled badly with the social side of things – and also the misbehaviour of classmates. S had health issues that meant she missed big chunks of time in class for hospital visits and stays. She was regularly sent home poorly or unable to go in for mornings – her worst time. The school were awkward about offering support, saying she was ‘clever enough and would catch up’. She struggled also socially because friendships were being forged in her absence and girls can be mean! We were struggling ourselves as parents, not really agreeing with the school system of over-testing and ‘one size fits all’ education.

Excited, but apprehensive I mentioned the idea of Home Education to my husband. Neither of us had enjoyed school, our kids were not enjoying it … so it just made sense! Cautiously I asked the children what they thought – no pressure, your choice. To be honest I expected reluctance, but they both jumped at the idea and that was that! We sent off de-registration letters during the holiday and they never returned. All decided in less than a week and we haven’t looked back!
We had one toddler too at that point (F) and have since had two more (R &E), none of whom have been to school – not even preschool. We hope they will always stay out, but the choice will be theirs.

We have tried many different approaches over the years. I love reading about the different styles of Home Education. I have never been one to follow a particular style strictly, I prefer to be inspired by the theories and take those that fit into our lifestyle. When life has been manic – house moves, new babies, etc. we have taken time off from scheduled work to be unschoolers/ autonomous. Inevitably though, both myself and the kids find ourselves wanting some kind of structure back in our days. I find it helps us stay focused and achieve more … even if those achievements are only those that the kids want for themselves. With so many children, at quite different ages and stages, all with different interests and personalities I found it too hard to meet everyone’s needs without some kind of routine. At least half of our household also like to know exactly what is happening each day too!

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Practising addition

A typical day for us would involve me and the smallest 3 waking somewhere around 6.30-7am. When we are all awake enough we have breakfast together and do what I call our ‘breakfast basket’, which is basically a selection of books I read aloud. Typically it will include picture books for the youngest and some fact books on a given theme for the week, some poems or a moral story to discuss. On busy periods I may just read our current chapter book instead. We use Five In A Row with the youngest – which means we cover various subjects just through discussing the picture books we read and using them as a springboard for more ideas. I often use my own choices of books too though, but with the same idea.
By this point the teens are starting to rise and we all get on with our designated household chores for the morning. After this I like them to go out in the garden for a bit of exercise and fresh air, while I do one to one with S – working on her English. They come in, I do some activities with the youngest two and F (8) has some time on the PC (I found he concentrates so much better later in the day if he’s already gamed, rather than clock-watching or asking constantly “Am I done now?”). S then goes to do her independent work. Some days at this point we have scheduled lessons or activities with other people. Other times the kids like to play on the LeapTV or just go off and play.

Lunch altogether, while I read our current read aloud chapter book, then various lunchtime chores. I am hoping to get more chance to get a trip to the park in after lunch as the weather improves, but so far that hasn’t happened as often as I’d like. Then I work one to one with F. This has to be very small bursts (10 minutes per activity). We practice handwriting, reading and maths, etc. He has a few workbooks he chooses to do, but for the most part we play games.

The little two usually appear again at this point – requesting ‘work’ too, so I have some basic workbooks or sheets they can join in with. We have different activities during the afternoons, some I reserve for play dates, park trips or others we have family activities we do until dinner time – board games, cooking, arts and crafts, etc.

One of the highlights of our week is nearly always on Tuesdays when we have our ‘History Tea-Time’… with table set with sandwiches and cakes and hot chocolate in a teapot I read books or we watch YouTube videos of our current topic. Last year we covered explorers, this year we are looking at inventors and inventions. I like to find picture books that really bring the events to life, rather than just factual encyclopedias for example. Food + read alouds often go hand in hand here – it helps wriggly bottoms stay on seats and ears listening if the mouths are busy chewing!

My favourite things about home edding include seeing my children bond so closely with each other and also getting to spend so much more of their precious childhood with them. I love feeling so connected with their development, getting to see them have those ‘aha!’ moments and really seeing them progress. Or the times when they enthuse to others how much they enjoy learning at home. I also enjoy being able to encourage their individual interests, to help them make the most of their strengths.

Another thing that I love about home edding is the choices available for trips, the amazing opportunities that our kids get. A recent example being a trip to the Holocaust Museum, for my 14 year old – complete with a chance to listen to and ask questions to a survivor. It was an amazing, emotional and unforgettable experience. He was an incredible man and left an impact on everyone who met him. From PGL  activity holidays to workshops held in The Royal Courts of Justice or The Houses of Parliament, from making pizzas in Pizza Express to a tour of the sewage works, our kids get some great experiences!

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Recent trip to Holocaust Museum

The hardest things can be not having enough energy/time in the day to do all that I want to with them. Likewise, trying to have realistic expectations of what is achievable! With such a large age range I can often feel disappointed that we don’t get to go on as many trips as I’d like either – but I console myself that as the little ones get bigger more will be possible!
My best bit of advice for other home edders would be that if something isn’t working, if your child is not enjoying it or it is hard work … try something different! Sometimes you only need a small tweak, other times a complete overhaul. Don’t be confined by a certain style or curriculum, what works for one might not for you and there is no point having all the freedom of choice that comes with home edding if you don’t make the most of it! 

100 Days of Home Ed #LoveHomeEd – Day 42 (With a Hop, Skip and a Jump)

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My name is Kate and my husband home educates our eldest son Dylan. We have two younger children who both attend mainstream local schools.
Dylan attended special education settings until year 4 when we decided to home educate using a ABA (applied behaviour analysis) approach. Our reason for home educating was because we felt that Dylans needs weren’t being met and as a quiet and easy child he was being overlooked.

Initally the education was overseen by a privately funded ABA consultant who visits us once a month to see how we are getting on. We review targets, trouble shoot and set new programmes. The set up is geared up totally towards Dylan and what he needs. When we first started there were lessons to hold a pencil. To come and sit down. To learn to write his name. It then became more academic with counting, working with money and time and basic reading.

As Dylan is now 13 we are looking at more life skill activities such as shopping for groceries, making basic meals, travel practice etc. There is no typical week. Some weeks are more productive than others. Some are spend consolidating previous skills. It’s flexible!

The favourite thing about home edding is the pace. Dylan was always so anxious with the unpredictability and rush of the school run and the school day it was a real barrier to his learning. He is so much happier now and thus able to learn!

The hardest thing about home education is the cost. With sen and no financial help it means that overtime at work is a must! It’s also hard in school holidays when every where’s so busy, and we’ve got used to everywhere being quiet and relaxed during term time.

Advice? Go with your gut instinct. The idea of home education is a frightening one but the reality is its really cool. As parents we know our kids better than anyone and if home education is something your considering then chances are it’s worth taking the plunge and doing it!

Follow Kate and Dylan’s journey over at their blog:

www.withahopskipandajump.com

100 Days of Home Ed #LoveHomeEd – Day 41 (Emma)

I’m Emma, married to Paul and mum to Chloe (18) , Ethan (14) and Tabitha (8). 

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At the theatre to watch Matilda

I started home educating when Chloe was 5. She wasn’t enjoying her reception year at school, so we decided to home educate. My other two have never been to school.

We don’t really have a typical week other than our regular activities (swimming, basketball, piano lesson, Sea cadets, Brownies, dance classes are some of those!). We have just moved, so our routine has been all over the place for the last few months. My oldest is now at university, so I just have my younger two at home. My 14 year old is pretty much unschooled, whereas my 8 year old prefers much more structure to her learning. Home ed has allowed me to educate my children according to their needs and abilities. Even within our little family I haven’t been able to use a one size fits all approach.

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Sketching at a local museum

Home education has given us so much freedom. We are able to plan our days.  Be it a holiday, museum trip, theatre visit, or simple spending the whole day in the garden or absorbed in a book or craft project. There are no bells, and no rush to move on to the next thing.
I am also grateful for the time home ed has given me. To be with my children for their younger years. It goes so fast. My advice to new home ed parents would be to slow down and enjoy it. There’s no need to sign up for everything or spend time rushing from one activity to another. Just being together is enough.

100 Days of Home Ed #LoveHomeEd – Day 40 (After Home Education: Going into Adulthood)

Please note this was originally published in March 2014 and has not been updated.

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People often wonder whether being home educated will somehow prevent access to higher education or otherwise limit future career prospects in some way. However in reality this is far from the case.

Here are some examples of various subjects that older home educated children have recently taken at university: Art, Medicine, Music, Veterinary Science, English, Child Development, Humanities, Psychology, Sociology, Media Make up and Special Effects, Law and Photographic Journalism.

These are a few of the careers that home educated people are now doing: Musician, IT technician, IT consultant, photographer, shop manager, professional athlete, carer, cinema manager, artist, music producer and BBC technician.

One such person was home educated in America from aged 9 onwards, using a part autonomous and part structured approach. When he got to high school age, his parents gave him the choice of going to school or choosing between various home school programs which would give him a high school qualification. He chose a program which had some structure and his general life experience also counted towards his studies.

He then took dual credit classes at a community college (university) that counted towards both high school credit and an associates degree. He now lives in England with his wife and children, where he works as consultant for a company’s Cloud product and is also mid IT degree, via part time study with the OU.

Compare the two lists above to any group of schooled children and you will see very little difference in the type of higher education courses typically taken up or in the nature of employment opportunities after compulsory education is complete. The only difference is that home educated children, generally speaking of course, often have greater freedom to pursue their own interests and gain life experience sooner. 

The alternative approach to education might also enable individuals to tune into their unique strengths earlier on, which perhaps might enable them to develop a particular expertise sooner. This means that in some cases these children may be more likely to follow personal passions and/or find their particular niche in life earlier on. In these instances, being home educated supports long-term career satisfaction and personal fulfilment.

Lastly some famous people who were apparently home educated:

  • Hilary Duff (actress, singer songwriter, author and entrepreneur)
  • Tim Tebow (quarterback for Denver Broncos)
  • Venus and Serena Williams (tennis players)
  • Agatha Christie (author)
  • Thomas Edison (inventor)
  • Franklin Roosevelt (president)
  • Jennifer Love Hewitt (actress, producer, director, singer songwriter)

100 Days of Home Ed #LoveHomeEd – Day 39 (Why Do People Decide To Home Educate?)

There are lots of reasons why families initially decide to home educate. For some it is a lifestyle choice made from the beginning, whilst others take the plunge later on for other reasons, often unforeseen. Here are some of the most common reasons for ditching the system and joining our ever-expanding home ed community…

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Lifestyle choice

For some families, home education is their first choice. The decision is made early on and they home educate right from the beginning; their children simply don’t start school. Sometimes this is because they were home educated themselves and had a good experience so feel it is the right path for their own children too. Others feel it fits better with their own personal parenting philosophy, as these parents explain:

“It never crossed my mind to send him to school… we followed natural parenting philosophy, it didn’t feel right to suddenly change everything about his life at 4 years old.” ~ Bx

“I felt like at 4 yrs old J was far too young to go to school, I wanted him to have a childhood of freedom to play and play and play some more, I don’t feel like early years education is child centred or based on up to date research about how our children learn and thrive. I also wanted my boys to be together as children and sending J off to school whilst L was home with me didn’t feel right to us.” ~ Maria

“My husbands career plan involved travelling and we wanted to be together as a family.” ~ Katie Jo

“FREEDOM!!!!” ~ Samantha


SEND 

Another common reason is that parents feel that the school is not meeting their child’s needs and/ or there is no suitable provision available. Often parents of SEND children feel that the school system tries to make their child fit into a mould that they are just not designed to fit into. This can result in all sorts of issues; it can affect behaviour, lead to bullying, cause damaged self-esteem and mean they start falling (often drastically) behind developmentally/ academically. These are just a few examples. Whilst some SEND parents make this decision early on, others resort to home ed only after multiple failed attempts to find adequate provision. 

“Inclusion… lack of.” ~ Sam

Bullying or other school issues

Sad but true; bullying is another common reason that parents remove their child from school and opt to home educate them. Often they have tried to approach the school to tackle the problem but feel they are left with no choice but to pull their child out of that environment before further damage is done.

Of course there is often actually a combination of the above reasons!